Courses Spring 2018

GER 1120 – Elementary German I, multiple sections

 

For more information, contact:

Ray Hattaway

Office: DIF 316b

Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu

 

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.

 

GER 1120 – Elementary German II, multiple sections

 

For more information, contact:

Prof. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe

Office: DIF 362

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

 

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

Prerequisite: GER 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.

 

GER 2220 – Intermediate German, multiple sections

 

For more information, contact:

Ray Hattaway

Office: DIF 316b

Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu

 

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: GER 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.

 

GER 3310 – German Grammar

Intermediate German Grammar. A comprehensive review and practice of German language.

 

Course meetings: Tu/Th 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm

Classroom: BEL 209

Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin

Office: DIF 368

E-mail: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

 

The course offers a comprehensive intermediate program designed for students who have completed two semesters of college (or two years of high school) German. The course is designed to increase and improve competence and proficiency in German grammar. This will be done through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation. The primary objectives of this course are to strengthen and increase student’s previous abilities in the German language and to perfect competence and proficiency in German grammar. By reviewing previous grammar points and by adding more detailed explanations students will be able to work on the intermediary language level of language learning. This course will enhance student’s ability to use correct grammar and function in the German language (writing, speaking, listening) with greater confidence.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent.

 

GER 3500 – German Studies

“Made in Germany:” Ideas, Inventions, and Events in German Culture

 

Course meetings: Mon/We/Fr 12:20 – 1:10 pm

Classroom: WMS 204

Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber

Office: DIF 316

Email: aweber@fsu.edu

 

This course, taught entirely in German, serves as an introduction to the study of German culture. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is put on increasing students’ German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. Students will be also introduced to basic tools of literary analysis and interpretation.

 

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent. This course is mandatory for the German major.

 

 

GER 3780 – Phonetics

 

Course meetings: Tu/Th 2:00 – 3:15 pm

Classroom: DIF 116

Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe

Office: DIF 362

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

 

Phonetics is the branch of linguistics devoted to sounds. This course is an introduction to the study of phonetics and phonology of Modern German. We will incorporate a short overview of

phonetics to make ourselves familiar with some sound theory as much as it is relevant to the German language. No background in linguistics is assumed. The course begins by making conscious the properties of the speech sounds of English. We will then investigate sounds that are unique to German. Finally, we will focus on the most difficult German sounds: those that are not identical to English ones, but similar enough to be misidentified with them. The goal of this course is a practical one: to improve your pronunciation of German. The knowledge that you will gain from this progression is both practical and theoretical. All readings will be in English. Course material will be a selected textbook as well as instructor-generated handouts that will be uploaded on Canvass.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent.

 

 

LIN 4930/GER 3930 – Special Topics

Language Planning

 

Course meetings: Tu/Th 9:30 – 10:45 am

Classroom: DIF 314

Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe

Office: DIF 362

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

 

Language planning is the conscious effort to influence the function, structure, or acquisition of languages within a community. It involves three different levels of planning: corpus planning, status planning, and acquisition planning. Leading to a language policy, language planning takes place at the intersection of politics, ideology, economics, and sociolinguistics. However, as a regulating instrument it is not often transparent to the public who the agency behind the engineering is: formal or informal agencies, committees, societies or academies? In whose interest is it to pursue language planning and for what reasons? We will explore issue on the micro- as well as macro-level moving between the analysis of words and the politics of language. The following issues will be explored: lexical engineering, purism, language education, prescriptivism that becomes normativism, national languages, language death, language revival and linguistic human rights to counteract language death. Students will learn to think critically, analyze language issues, and demonstrate awareness of how language communicates identity and interacts with culture. We will look at a variety of languages that have undergone language planning yet with different outcomes.

This course is taught in English.

Prerequisite (for GER 3930): GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent.

 

 

GEW 4591 – Studies in an Author or Theme

GEW 5595 – Studies in a Theme

Heroes and Tricksters

 

Course Meetings: Mo/We 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm

Classroom: DIF 116

Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber

Office: DIF 316

Email: aweber@fsu.edu

 

Heroes and tricksters are the most predominant character models in western cultures, if not universally. The course introduces to examples of such classical figures from German culture, for example Hildebrand and Parzival, Eulenspiegel and Reineke Fuchs, and contemporary heroes and tricksters from literature and film. Theories from ethnology, folklore, and psychoanalysis will guide students in analyzing these models and their workings in current everyday life, cultural production, and ideology. As the class familiarizes itself with German and English texts and other materials in this course, students will also improve their German reading and oral comprehension, spoken and written proficiency through a variety of class activities and assignments.

 

Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. The course is taught in German.

 

 

GEW 4592 – Studies in a Period or Movement

GEW 5597 – Studies in a Period: Special Topics

Exile and Nazi Germany

 

Course meetings: Tu/Th 3:35 – 4:50 pm

Classroom: DIF 214

Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin

Office: DIF 368

E-mail: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

 

This course explores works of German writers who were forced into exile during the Third Reich (1933-1945) to escape persecution by Hitler and the Nazi state. This includes famous writers like Bertolt Brecht, Thomas Mann, Stefan Zweig, and Anna Seghers whose works are considered a major part of the German literary canon. These authors became exiles first in neighboring countries such as France, Austria, Czech Republic but then with the advancing German army had to flee Europe to find refuge in the US and other continents. The course examines how these writers address the destruction of the German language and culture and present their appeals for moral considerations and human rights to assist in the fight against Nazi evil. Taking into consideration the historical, literary, cultural, political, and economic aspects, this course reflects with the help of these authors on a dark period of German history when human rights were not guaranteed for every German citizen.

Prerequisites: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course is taught in German.

 

 

GER 5940: Teaching Practicum

For more information, contact:

Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe Office: DIF 362

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu