2017 Spring Courses

Courses Spring 2017


GER 1120 – Elementary German II, multiple sections

Instructor: TBA

For more information, contact:

Ray Hattaway

Phone: 644-8191

Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed. Prerequisite: Ger 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GER 2220 – Intermediate German, multiple sections

Instructor: TBA

For more information, contact:

Ray Hattaway

Phone: 644-8191

Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: GER 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GER 3310 – German Grammar

Intermediate German Grammar. A comprehensive review and practice of German language

Course meetings: Tu/Th 9:30 – 10:45 am

Classroom: DIF 104

Instructor: Ray Hattaway

Phone: 644-8191

Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu

This course focuses on the rules of German grammar and syntax and employing them correctly in speaking and writing. It and offers a comprehensive intermediate program for students having completed the minimum of GER 2220 or the equivalent and are at the Intermediate level. Students will review their basic understanding of German Language and expand their skills in detail at the intermediate level. In addition, the students will practice correspondence and speaking skills as needed in communicative activities, e.g., essays, letters, resumes, interviews, presentations, etc. This course also serves to further improve the students’ language skills from the intermediate level toward the advanced level. This will be done through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation. By reviewing previous grammar points and by adding more detailed explanations students will be able to work on the intermediary level of language learning. Students will be given ample opportunity to develop their ability to write and converse in German at this level on topics of general interest. Students will increase and improve their competence and proficiency in all aspects of German grammar.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent.


GER 3500 – German Studies

“Made in Germany”: Ideas, Inventions, and Events in German Culture

Course meetings: Mon/We/Fr 12:20 – 1:10 pm

Classroom: DIF 129

Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber

Phone: 645-7842

Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course serves as an introduction to the study of German culture. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is put on increasing students’ German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. Students will be also introduced to basic tools of literary analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent. This course is taught in German and mandatory for the German major.


GER 3930, FOL 3930 – Special Topics

The Globalization of Language

Course meetings: Tu/Th 12:30 – 1:45 pm

Classroom: DIF 104

Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe

Phone: TBA

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

This course investigates how an increase in mobility, and the exponential development of new communication technologies, has introduced a transnational language behavior causing some languages to become more dominant than others. The empowerment of one language has not only induced an imbalance in cultural and political power but has also generated hybrid language communities. Reading linguistic literature, looking at film, food, music, discourse and text about popular culture, students will learn to define globalization linguistically, historically, economically, and culturally to understand what the social realities of globalization are.

The course is taught in English. (No German prerequisites.)


GET 3130 – Masterpieces of German Literature in Translation

Passion and Imagination in German Literature

Class meetings: Mon/We 5:15 – 6:30 pm

Classroom: DIF 129

Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber

Phone: 644-8192

E-mail: aweber@fsu.edu

The course introduces students to masterpieces of German literature from the nineteenth century to the present. The authors of these works are of various ethnic, minority, and gender backgrounds. Their texts thematize representations of gendered or cultural Others and transcultural topics. By exploring these works and the issues they bring forth, the course enables students to develop critical competence in both literary analysis and diversity in Western culture. In its emphasis on cultural context and the students’ creative interaction with fiction, the course offers non-German speakers an overview of German literary masterpieces while promoting their skills of understanding, interpreting, and writing about multicultural literature.

The course fulfills the Liberal Studies requirements: “Area IV: Literature W” and “Cultural Practice Y.” The course offers credit for German majors and minors. It is taught in English and has no prerequisites.


GEW 4591- Studies in an Author or Theme

GET 5588 - Studies in a Theme

GEW 5595, FOL 5934 - Studies in a Theme

Discourse Analysis

Course meetings: Tu/Th 3:35 pm – 4:50 pm

Classroom: DIF 210

Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe

Phone: TBA

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

We communicate with others every day not paying attention to what we do and how we do it. Using language happens intuitively and yet socialization happens primary through language. This course will study comparatively the particular use of language in communication. We will compare different languages as our cultural and social identities come into play. The students will read scholarly texts, look at samples from cinema, ideological discourse in media.

Secondary language (German) competency is not required. While the course takes place in English, however, German students and other foreign language students will be required to read additional texts in their respective languages.


GEW 4592 - Studies in a Period or Movement

GEW 5596 - Studies in an Author or Movement

German Myths in Modern Culture

Course meetings: Mo/We 3:35 – 4:50 pm

Classroom: DIF 216

Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber

Phone: 644-8192

E-mail: aweber@fsu.edu

Nordic and Germanic myths continue a lively existence in modern and contemporary German and Anglo-American cultures. This course introduces students to the German adaptation of such myths, from the late medieval Lay of the Nibelungs to their problematic reinvention in nineteenth-century German opera and in films from different eras. Exploring such myth updates, students will become familiar with fundamental themes of German culture and their modifications and critiques. They will also become familiar with canonical works of German literature, theatre/opera, and film. Not least, we will explore the Anglo-American reception of German Myths, for example in successful novels and blockbuster films, for example Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit and the films based on them, Marvel’s Thor series, or Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained.


IFS 3052, E-series: “Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-)Human Condition”

Course meetings: Mon 5:15-7:30 pm and We 5:15-6:30 pm

Classroom: HCB 314

Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber

Office: DIF 316c

Phone: 645-7842

E-mail: cweber@fsu.edu

We are using technology every day in so many different ways and to such great extent that we have become often unaware of it. Only seldom do we reflect on the longer term transformative effects that certain technologies have on us beyond their immediate usefulness. By analyzing seminal works of literature and film, this course investigates the intricate relationship between humans and machines from both practical and theoretical (theological, ethical, anthropological, sociological) perspectives.

We will search for answers to fundamental questions about the human condition: Has the evolution of technology resulted in the progress or regress of humanity? Does technology liberate humans from natural constraints or does it rather enslave them to machines? What are the pros and cons of certain technological innovations for the individual, society, and humanity at large? What ethical and societal problems define our relationship to technology? How could we define criteria for a responsible use and utilization of technology?

This course meets the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century competencies in the areas of Ethically Engaged and Socially Responsible Citizens and Thoughtful Patrons of and Participants in Cultural Practices.


GER 5940 - Teaching Practicum

For more information, contact:

Ray Hattaway

Phone: 644-8191

Email: rhattawa@fsu.edu


Courses archive