Courses Spring 2014

 
GER 1120: Elementary German I Multiple Sessions

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 or GET 3524.

 

GER 1121: Elementary German II Multiple Sessions

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

Prerequisite: Ger 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 or GET 3524.

 

GER 2220: Intermediate German Multiple Sessions

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: Ger 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 or GET 3524.

 

 

 

GER 3310: German Grammar

Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Phone: 644-8399
Email: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

The course offers a comprehensive intermediate program designed for students who have completed two semesters of college [or two years of high school] German. The course is designed to increase and improve competence and proficiency in German grammar. This will be done through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation.

The primary objectives of this course are to strengthen and increase student's previous abilities in the German language and to perfect competence and proficiency in German grammar. By reviewing previous grammar points and by adding more detailed explanations students will be able to work on the intermediary language level of language learning. This course will enhance student's ability to use correct grammar and function in the German language (writing, speaking, listening) with greater confidence. Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent.

 

 

 

GER 3500: "Made in Germany:" Ideas, Inventions, and Events in Modern German Culture (1770-Present)

Dr. Christian Weber

Office: Diffenbaugh 316C
Phone: 644-8194
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course is taught entirely in German and serves as an introduction to German studies. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is put on increasing students' German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. Students will be also introduced to basic tools of literary analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent.

 

 

 

GER 3930: Native Americans in German Literature & Film

Dr. A. Dana Weber
Office: Diffenbaugh 316
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

The course offers students a survey of German culture's fantasies about its most beloved "Other," Native Americans, in literary texts, films, comic books, and performances. We will engage with a variety of genres (poems, short-stories, theatre, novels by canonical authors) from German literature since the late eighteenth century to the present and reflect about how their exoticized fictional figures shift to film since the last decades of the twentieth. Short theoretical readings by scholars and Native American critics will aid our engagement with these problematic representations.

Apart from introducing to a crucial focus of German-speaking cultures, the course's readings, screenings, discussions, and creative and academic assignments will improve students' analytical and critical capacities and their German reading comprehension, speaking, and writing skills.

The course it taught in German. Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent.

 

 

 

FOL 3930.07 / GER 3930.02: Holocaust: The Legacy, Remembrance and Aftermath of Nazi Crimes Against Humanity

Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Phone: 644-8399
Email: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

Using mostly film and some literary texts, this course looks at aspects of remembrance in the aftermath of Nazi crimes against humanity from a German perspective.

Films to be discussed include: The Seventh Cross, Richie Boys, White Rose, the Reader, Nasty Girl, Blind Spot, Hitler's Children, as well as texts by Ruth Klüger, Paul Celan and Bernhard Schlink.

The course explores questions about how film and literature engage in a discourse of remembrance and reflection on the effort of German society to formulate an appropriate cultural memory of the Nazi past. Drawing on the perspectives of victims, perpetrators, resistors, and bystanders, it investigates how cultural memory is created after these horrific events, how filmmakers, writers, and memorials reveal a multiplicity of voices and reflect on the indelible mark of the Nazi past in Germany. This course is taught in English.

 

 

 

GER 5060: Graduate Reading Knowledge

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

The focus of this course is to enable students to develop techniques essential in attaining a proficiency in the reading and translation of German language. With the assistance of a good dictionary and traditional resources, students will be able to read and understand scholarly material in their respective fields. This course offers students a way to adequately prepare for the GER 5069 Graduate Reading Knowledge Exam (German). Texts: Richard Alan Korb, Jannach's German for Reading Knowledge, (6th edition - previous editions will not work) // Good German/English dictionary (required)

 

 

 

 

GEW4591/GEW5596: Germanic Myths in Modern Times

Dr. A. Dana Weber
Office: Diffenbaugh 316
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

The course explores how - with contradictory and often controversial effects - the re-discovery of the 'Germanic' past in the nineteenth century continues to influence German and Western literature, theatre, and film to this day. We will trace the trajectory of the German 'national epic' Das Nibelungenlied [Lay of the Nibelungs] (a medieval text) and its manifold literary, filmic, and theatrical adaptations and appropriations, for example by Richard Wagner, Fritz Lang, the National Socialists, and in the post-World-War II era. Readings from Friedrich Nietzsche, Thomas Mann, T. W. Adorno, and Siegfried Kracauer will serve as our theoretical tools for questioning, analyzing, and critiquing how the idealized 'Germanic' past was re-imagined and manipulated by successive ideological regimes with lasting effects on both German and English-speaking (especially American) cultures. (Graduate and undergraduate readings and assignments are appropriate to students' academic and linguistic levels.)

 

 

 

GEW 4592/5597: "German ImagiNATION"

 

Dr. Christian Weber
Office: Diffenbaugh 316C
Phone: 644-8194
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course traces the emergence of ideas of national identity in various German speaking states: Switzerland, Habsburg-Austria, Prussia and diverse German nation states. We shall see how particular nationalisms have been 'constructed' by defining cultural self-identities and demonizing 'alien' influences (French, Eastern European, Jewish, American). The latter resulted in the birth of demonic figures like the vampire, the Golem, and the cold-hearted social engineer. Readings cover a broad variety of genres (drama, prose, travelogues, essays, newspaper articles) and texts from canonical authors (among them Schiller, Goethe, Fichte, Heine, Wagner, Nietzsche, Thomas Mann, and Joseph Roth). We will ask ourselves: What is/forms a nation? What specific ideas have constituted national identities in German speaking states? How has German nationalism changed over the past two centuries? What are the alternatives to the political imagination of the nation?

 

 
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