Courses Spring 2015

 
 

GER 1121, Elementary German I (multiple sessions)

Contact: Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed. Prerequisite: Ger 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 or GET 3524.

 

GER 1121, Elementary German II (multiple sessions)

Contact: Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed. Prerequisite: Ger 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 or GET 3524.

 

GER 2220, Intermediate German (multiple sessions)

Contact: Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: Ger 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 or GET 3524.

 

GER 3310 German Grammar

Course meetings: TuTh 12:30PM - 1:45PM, BEL 006

Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin

Office: Diffenbaugh368
Phone: 644-8399
Email: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

The course offers a comprehensive intermediate program designed for students who have completed two semesters of college (or two years of high school) German. The course is designed to increase and improve competence and proficiency in German grammar. This will be done through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation.

The primary objectives of this course are to strengthen and increase student's previous abilities in the German language and to perfect competence and proficiency in German grammar. By reviewing previous grammar points and by adding more detailed explanations students will be able to work on the intermediary language level of language learning. This course will enhance student's ability to use correct grammar and function in the German language (writing, speaking, listening) with greater confidence. Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent.

 

GER 3500 German Studies

"Made in Germany": Ideas, Inventions, and Events in Modern German Culture

Course meetings: MoWeFr 12:20PM - 1:10PM, DIF 114

Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber

Office: Diffenbaugh 316c

E-mail: cweber@fsu.edu

This course, taught entirely in German, serves as an introduction to German studies. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries. Emphasis is put on increasing students' German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. Students will be also introduced to basic tools of literary analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor's consent.

 

 

GER 3130 "Passion and Imagination in German Literature" (Masterpieces of German Literature)

Fulfills the Liberal Studies requirements: Area IV Y Literature W and Cultural Practice Y. The course is taught in English.

Course meetings: MoWe 3:35PM - 4:50PM, DIF 0129

Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber

Office: Diffenbaugh 316

E-mail: aweber@fsu.edu

What are 'passion' and 'imagination'? How do German authors express them in their writings? What is the role of both in the literary articulation of ideological and political issues? And how do the two concepts play out in narratives of gender and cultural difference? Engaging with the passionate and imaginative aspects of classical works of German literary works will prompt our discussions and expand our knowledge for what these two concepts mean for our own thinking and affective identities and how they continue to enrich our lives today.

At the end of this course, students will be familiar with major works of German literature. They will be able to think critically and to analyze literature from a variety of perspectives. Students will have learned how to formulate their ideas in an adequate critical and analytical spoken and written language.

 

GEW 3320 Drama

Course meetings: TuTh 2:00PM - 3:15pm, DIF 0112

Instructor: Ray Hattaway

Office: Diffenbaugh 316b

Phone: 644-8191

E-mail: rhattawa@fsu.edu

The objective of this course is to introduce intermediate students of German to selected works of German drama. The course teaches students how to read dramas and how to employ the basic tools of literary analysis. Drama is much more than the combination of the literary arts of storytelling and poetry on stage. Students will also learn about the literary and historical contexts in which the plays were written. A play involves the collaborative process, and the study of drama encompasses acting, directing, writing, music and art in addition to the thematic content portrayed. Not only as a form of entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. For a better understanding of this rich art form, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, collaborate on, and review examples of dramatic performances in text and on film. A major objective of the course is to develop and improve the students' abilities to read, write, and speak German. Students will produce a video//audio document based on selections from the dramas covered. The prerequisite for this course is GER 2220, or permission of the instructor.

Course Materials/Plays: Bertolt Brecht, Die Dreigroschenoper; Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Der Besuch der alten Dame; Max Frisch, Biedermann und die Brandstifter; Leonie Ossowski, Voll auf der Rolle (provided by instructor). All of the plays except Voll auf der Rolle have been translated into English. German, Bilingual, and English copies are available inexpensively from Online sellers.

 

GEW 4591/ GEW 5595, "German Humor"

Course meetings: TuTh 3:35PM - 4:50PM, DIF 216

Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin

Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Phone: 644-8399
Email: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

Humor is an essential part of German folk tradition as well as literature, film, and culture. This course covers various works of German literature, film, and visual art in which humor is expressed, constructed, and reflected (in and outside of) German culture. We will explore a wide variety of authors, including Kurt Tucholsky, Karl Valentin, Erich Kästner, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Thaddäus Troll, among them philosophers (Immanuel Kant) and artists who created and discussed humor. We will look at different types of humor and ask questions such as: How is humor presented and constructed in the different works and media, how does humor work and function, what message and purpose does it carry, and how does it affect the audience.

Prerequisite: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. This course is taught in German.

 

GEW 4592/GEW 5208, "Heroes and Tricksters"

Course meetings: MoWe 5:15PM - 6:30PM, DIF 129

Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber

Office: Diffenbaugh 316

E-mail: aweber@fsu.edu

The course centers around the two most iconic character archetypes in German culture, heroes and tricksters. How do they shape iconic figures of German literature and culture such as Parsifal, Reynard the Fox, the Baron of Münchhausen or heroic mothers? How do these figures affect our cultural perceptions and ethical judgments? How do they shape concepts of heroic action or subversive mischief? The course familiarizes students with major figures in canonical works by authors from Wolfram von Eschenbach to H.J.C. von Grimmelshausen and from J.W. Goethe to Bertolt Brecht. We will discuss these figures in light of theoretical concepts from cultural and folklore theory. The course is taught in German. It offers students the opportunity to improve both their critical and analytical skills and their linguistic abilities in both speech and writing.

Undergraduate prerequisite: Two 3000-level courses or instructor permission. The course is taught in German.

 

IFS 3052, E-series: "Robots, Monsters, Avatars: Technology and the (Post-)Human Condition"

Mo 5:15PM - 7:30PM, We 5:15PM - 6:30PM, Dodd Hall Auditorium 0103

Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber

Office: Diffenbaugh 316c

E-mail: cweber@fsu.edu

We are using technology every day in so many different ways and to such great extent that we have become often unaware of it. Only seldom do we reflect on the longer term transformative effects that certain technologies have on us beyond their immediate usefulness. By analyzing seminal works of literature and film, this course investigates the intricate relationship between humans and machines from both theoretical (theological, ethical, sociological) and practical perspectives.

We will search for answers to fundamental questions of the human condition:

- Has the evolution of technology resulted in the progress or regress of humanity? Does technology liberate humans from natural constraints or does it rather enslave them to machines?

- What are the pros and cons of certain technological innovations for the individual, society, and humanity at large? What ethical and societal problems define our relationship to technology? How could we define criteria for a responsible use and utilization of technology?

 

GER 5069 Reading Knowledge (Examination)

For more information, please contact: Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

 

GER 5940, Teaching Practicum

For more information, please contact: Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

 
 
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