Fall 2013 courses

 

GER 1120: Elementary German I Multiple Sessions

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

 

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220.

 

 

GER 1121: Elementary German II Multiple Sessions

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

 

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed.

Prerequisite: Ger 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220.

 

 

GER 2220: Intermediate German Multiple Sessions

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

 

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion.

Prerequisite: Ger 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120,and/or 1121.

 

GET 3524yW: German Cinema

Christian Weber
Office: Diffenbaugh 316C
Phone: 645-7842
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

Nationalists, Socialists and Democrats:

The Many Faces of Germany on Film

 

Germany experienced no less than six different forms of state regime (German Empire, Weimar Republic, NS-Regime, Germany divided in Socialist Eastern and Capitalist Western states, Berlin Republic) during the past twentieth century. As such, it lived through the decisive struggles of the modern and postmodern age: nationalism, social clashes, race issues, the Holocaust, ideological conflicts between communism and capitalism, migration and immigration, deportation, women's emancipation, etc.

Accordingly, German cinema underwent strange transformations. This course examines the fascinating history of German cinema as an epitomic example of modern Western culture and invites students to reflect about and actively engage with many cultural topics in the form of writing film reviews and an in-depth analytical essay.

The course fulfills the multicultural requirement of Diversity in Western Experience ("Y").

It is taught in agreement with FSU's Gordon Rule Writing Criteria ("W").

 

 

GEW 3370 German Short Fiction

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

The objective of this survey course is to introduce intermediate students of German to selected examples of short fiction. Additional materials will be discussed in order to gain a wider understanding of the impact of short fiction as a predominant genre of German literature (Novelle). These will include selections from novels, short-stories, letters and auto-biographical resources by the respective authors popular mainly in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course also serves as a beginning orientation in those periods. The materials selected reflect a variety of thematic content. The course acquaints the student with just how vitally each author was concerned with these elements. Additional cultural and historical perspective will be gained by the investigation of the times and places in which they were written. Students will also gain an overview of each author's achievements and the literary, cultural, and historical contexts in which they occurred. A major objective of the course is to improve the students' abilities to read, write, and speak German.

 

GER 3400 Composition and Conversation

Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Phone: 644-8399
Email: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

This course is designed for students who have completed GER 2220 or the equivalent. The purpose is to bring the students language skills from the intermediate level to the beginning advanced level.
The course will give students an opportunity to develop their ability to write and converse in German at a beginning advanced level on topics of general interest. A student entering the advanced level can narrate and describe events in the present, future, and past (e.g., talk about past events, discuss plans, retell a story). In addition, students can express opinions (e.g., have an argument, participate in a discussion) as well as ask and answer questions and initiate, continue, and close a conversation. A student at the beginning advanced level can speak and write with enough grammatical accuracy that errors do not interfere with comprehension and do not contain mistakes made by beginners.

 

GER 3440 German Business / Language Practice

Ray Hattaway
Office: Diffenbaugh 316B
Phone: 644-8191
Email: rhattaway@fsu.edu

This course will introduce the intermediate-level student to German of the business world (speaking and writing). The student will gain a basic understanding of German business practices and the economic and social structures of business in the German speaking countries. In addition, the student will practice basic correspondence and speaking skills needed in business, e.g., letters, resumes, interviews, presentations. In addition, this course also serves to introduce intermediate students of German to a variety of topics within the general area of business as reflected in German speaking areas. The course also acquaints and provides students basic understanding and insight into the development of German Business Culture as evidenced today. Students will also gain an overview of German Business achievements in the cultural and historical contexts in which they occurred. A major objective of the course is to improve the students' abilities to read, write, and speak German.

 

 

 

GER 3502: Gender and Violence in German Literature

Dana Weber
Office: Diffenbaugh 316
Email: aweber@fsu.edu

 

Prerequisite: GER 2220 or GER 3400 or Instructor permission.

In this course, we will explore German literary texts from the early nineteenth century to the present, in which narratives of violence and gender comment upon their contemporary historical, social, and aesthetic contexts. We will investigate what violence reveals about gender parameters, how the relationship between these two concepts changes or not throughout time, and how both continue to inform our own conceptions and outlook of the world. While the course offers an overview of German literary eras, authors, and genres, it also enhances students' reading comprehension and critical skills alongside developing their oral and written proficiency in German.

 

 

GEW4930/GEW5595: Berlin in Literature and Film

Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Phone: 644-8399
Email: bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu

This course offers a literary and cinematographic excursion into the rich cultural life of Berlin in the twentieth century. It exlplores Berlin during the time of Imperial Germany, the Weimar Republic, the National Socialist State, the German Democratic Republic, and since 1991, Berlin the capital of the unified German Federal Republic. The course examines such questions as how and to what extent the unstable social and political climate of the time period is reflected in films and literary texts. We will explore how Berlin underwent a number of significant ideological, political and physical transformations which contribute to historical richness that is perhaps unmatched by any Western capital.

This course is taught in German. It is recommended that students took at least two courses on the 3000 level

 

GEW 4592/5597: Goethe's Faust as the Drama of Modern Man

Christian Weber
Office: Diffenbaugh 316C
Phone: 645-7842
Email: cweber@fsu.edu

This course investigates the dramatic conflict between light (rationality and reason) and darkness (desire and imagination) in the late Eighteenth and early Nineteenth century. In the midst of this monumental battle between God and Devil (good and evil) stands the prototype of modern man, scholar and alchemist Faust, who desires to know "was die Welt im Innersten zusammenhält." By attentively reading Goethe's Faust (both in German and English) - without doubt the greatest monument of German literature and one of the great masterworks of world literature - we will encounter and discuss many problems of modernity (e.g. secularization, sexuality, bioengineering, technology, paper money economy) that are still up-to-date. Not only old Faust's soul, but also ours are at stake in this text.

Prerequisite: The successful completion of two courses on the 3000 level.

 

GER 5060: Graduate Reading Knowledge

The focus of this course is to enable students to develop techniques essential in attaining a proficiency in the reading and translation of German language. With the assistance of a good dictionary and traditional resources, students will be able to read and understand scholarly material in their respective fields. This course offers students a way to adequately prepare for the GER 5069 Graduate Reading Knowledge Exam (German).
Texts:
· Richard Alan Korb, Jannach's German for Reading Knowledge, (6th edition - previous editions will not work)
· Good German/English dictionary (required)

 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
   
   
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Legacy Sort
2
Legacy Priority
6