Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe

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ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Office: 362 Diffenbaugh

Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe holds a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana, IL. Her research centers on language and identity, the politics of language, minority languages, and translation studies. She explores in particular the performative function of language.

Publications: 

Book

In her sociolinguistic book, Twenty-First Century Yiddishism: Language, Identity, and the New Jewish Studies (Sussex Academic, 2012), Soldat-Jaffe explores the politics of Yiddish as a religious, an ethnic, and a secular language. Her work depicts the struggle Yiddish has experienced as a diaspora language.

Articles

  • Co-editor, Translation and the Global Humanities. Special issue of Centennial Review 16.1. (Forthcoming Spring 2016).
  • “Translation: An Exercise in Midrashic Reading.” In Centennial Review 16.1. Special Issue: Translation and the Global Humanities. T. Soldat-Jaffe, S. Bertacco, and P. Beattie (eds.) (Forthcoming Spring 2016).
  • “Performance-Oriented Religious Language Learning.” In T. Omoniji (ed). Sociology of Language and Religion. A Decade after Roehampton. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. (Forthcoming Fall 2016).
  • “Yiddish Wikipedia.” In Faith and Language Practices in Digital Spaces. A. Rosowsky. (ed.). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. (Forthcoming 2016).
  • "The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages for the Protection of Regional Cultures and Languages: A Magnum Opus or a Modus Vivendi?" Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Matters. June 2014.
  • "Zombie Linguistics. " In The Year’s Work in Braiiins: Zombies vs. Professors. A. Jaffe and E. Comentale (eds.). Bloomington: Indiana University, 2014, pp. 338-356.
  • Review of Rabinovitch, Lara et al. (eds.). 2012. Choosing Yiddish: New Frontiers of Language and Culture. Detroit: Wayne State University Press." In Journal of Jewish Languages, no. 1 (2013).
  • “Yiddish without Yiddishism: Tacit Language Planning Among Haredi Jews,” Journal of Jewish Identities, 3 (2) 2010: 1-24.