Courses - French

Current and Upcoming Courses

Spring 2021

FRW 4761 / 5765 : Intermediality in Transcultural Literature

Instructor: Dr. Michaela Hulstyn

Do poems and drawings speak differently about diaspora? How should we interpret the lyricism of a novel on bilingualism? What do we mean when we say that a text is “musical” or “cinematic”? This interdisciplinary course focuses on the philosophy, aesthetics, and politics of transcultural literature, which transcends national borders and geographic regions in order to both communicate and transcend the realities of topics such as (de/post/neo) colonialism, globalization, migration, multilingualism, racialization, and relation. Students will engage in comparative approaches to intermedial aesthetics across the Global French world from 1945 to the present. Genres include poetry, prose, film. Authors include Césaire, Khatibi, Ndiaye. Course taught in French.


FRW 4423/5588: Studies in 18th-century Literature--Material Objects and the French Empire in Eighteenth-Century France

Instructor: Dr. Mrin Bhattacharya

This class focuses on how material objects were shaped by empire, colonialism and geographic circulation in the eighteenth century. It engages, in particular, the form and aesthetics of objects that moved through different spaces and regions of the global eighteenth century. What kind of material entanglements emerged in the contact zones? What kind of hybrid and intercultural objects were created? What do these remade, reworked, and refashioned things illuminate about the intersections of material culture and empire? Object collections involving things collected from indigenous cultures will introduce students to material contexts of global commerce, colonialism, and discourses on property, whereas the revolutionary objects will help to think through the idea of objects as both space and medium. We will explore museum objects, decorative art, furniture, etc. before attending to the ways in which Encyclopédie represents collecting. The course will also introduce students to methods in the study of material culture in the context of literary and cultural studies. Textiles and texts will help to explore the silences and representations in both literary and material archival practices. The course will also introduce students to methods in the study of material culture in the context of literary and cultural studies. Authors include Montesquieu, Denis Diderot, Françoise de Graffigny, among others. Works by Beverly Lemire, Daniela Bleichmar, Madeleine Dobie, Chaela Pastore, Donna Bohanan, Maxine Berg, and Mimi Hellman will introduce students to varieties of critical frameworks to study material things. Taught in French.

Text may include: Françoise de Graffigny, Lettres D'une Peruvienne; Montesquieu, Lettres Persanes; Denis Diderot, Supplément au Voyage de Bougainville; Beaumarchais, Le Mariage de Figaro, Marivaux, La Dispute


FRW 5775: Narrating Epidemics: Disease, Society, and Culture in the Francophone World

Instructor: Dr. Vincent Joos

Epidemics and pandemics are not solely biological events. The longevity and spread of diseases is partially influenced by regional social structures and cultural norms. In the meantime, diseases transform our world, our social relations, our mobility, and our economic well-being. In this course, we will read 20th and 21st century French and Francophone novels in parallel with works in human geography and cultural anthropology to explore the individual and collective shifts epidemics and pandemics trigger. How diseases alter human interactions? How do they solidify national and regional borders? What do they reveal about the geopolitical order? How ideas about immunity, susceptibility, virology have produced understandings of race and national belonging? What cultural separations and social fractures have been caused by epidemics in the past hundred years? What diseases reveal in terms of economic, social, and gendered inequalities? How epidemics transform our sense of self and our relation to the natural world? Entering the history of France and francophone regions at crucial moments of biological crisis, this course aims to analyze the many ways diseases have transformed the human experience. It also seeks to understand how, in the past 50 years, neoliberal policies have wreaked havoc traditional healing systems and pushed the vulnerability to diseases in so-called poor regions of the Francophone world.

The course is in English. We will read novels, watch movies, and read scholarly works dealing with the Algerian plague, the 1918 flu, the 2011 Haitian cholera epidemic, the 1980s AIDS epidemic, and the novel Coronavirus. Among others, we will read books written by Camus, Le Clézio, Danticat, Meyer, Giono.

Fall 2020

FRW 4420/5586 Montaigne, Pascal, Descartes: Self, Reason, and the Passions in French Culture and Literature of the Late Renaissance and Early Classicism

Instructor: Dr. Reinier Leushuis

This course will be an in-depth exploration of the works of these three key humanists of the early modern and classical period. We will first focus on Montaigne's Essays, which we will utilize as a prism to understand both late French Renaissance culture and the major values of humanist literature, such as the emulation of ancient rhetorical forms and philosophical schools (e.g. Stoicism, Epicureanism, skepticism), the importance of education, the concern with the individual in its socio-political and religious surroundings, and the valorization of the self as a source of doubt, judgment, and knowledge. We will also address the literary form of the essay as a protean literary space that can absorb the poetics of a variety of other genres (poetry, dialogue, oratory, etc.). Montaigne's Essays will then form the springboard for our exploration into the thought of Descartes and Pascal. We will read their works not so much for the historical impact they had on theology and/or philosophy (which is amply addressed in courses on Western philosophy), but rather for a) the way in which they both continue and transform early modern humanist concerns of self, judgment, knowledge, truth, reason, and the emotions; and b) their formal, literary, and rhetorical staging of these concerns. For instance, we will assess to what extent the famous notions of Descartes's moi pensant ("thinking self") and Pascal's roseau pensant ("thinking reed") and "order of the heart" (l'ordre du coeur: "le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît pas" ["The heart has reasons that reason cannot know"]) can be understood as corollaries of Montaigne's "book of the self" (Regosin).


FRW 4761/5765: (Post)Colonial Migration

Instructor: Dr. Michelle Bumatay

The movement of people in the contemporary moment is often framed in the media and by politicians as a problem, yet it has been a constant element of human life since the origin of our species. With the movement of people also comes the movement of cultures, ideas, languages as well as goods, technology, and disease. While the ways in which people move have changed since the time of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, one key factor driving migration remains a constant: survival. In the Francophone context, since the early 19th century, selected young people from the French colonies traveled to the métropole to attend French schools. With World Wars I and II, colonial soldiers traveled to Europe to defend their supposed motherland and during the interwar period, many soldiers remained and interacted with students and artists from other parts of the French empire and the world. After World War II, during  les Trentes Glorieuses, France encouraged large numbers of workers, mainly from Algeria, the French Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa, to help rebuild and modernize the nation. More recently, many people fleeing oppressive dictatorships or seeking better economic opportunities have made the difficult decision to leave their homes. While in France, migrants often face discrimination for not resembling a certain construct of French national identity. In this course, we will consider how writers, filmmakers, and artists represent the complexities of migration including the shifts in discourse about and around migration in the French-speaking world in the 20th and 21st centuries.


FRW6938/SPW 6934/FOL 5934-0: Comparative Caribbean Studies, Climate Grief and Speculative Fictions

Instructor: Dr. Murray-Román

After Hurricane María devastated Dominica in 2017, Prime Minister Skerrit addressed the U.N. General Assembly about climate change's impact on the Caribbean region stating: "We as a country, and as a region, did not start this war on nature … have made no contribution to global warming that can move the needle. But yet, we are among the main victims: the stars have fallen, Eden is broken." Climate grief as an affect and a political disposition has come to dominate conversations about Caribbean futures. In this course, we will examine how artists and writers use the genres of speculative fiction to address the environmental questions that threaten the very existence of Caribbean peoples.

Speculative fiction: this genre, which is the inspiration for an important vein of late twentieth and twenty-first century creative and theoretical work, include fantasy, science fiction, gothic horror, and has been linked to Latin American magical realism. Famously rising to prominence during Cuba's special period, it is now a vital genre for Caribbean writers throughout the region to reimagine history and to imagine radical futures, circulating widely in the region, in the global literary market, and as scholarly objects of analysis. This class examines the emergence and significance of this important development in Caribbean literature by examining authors, visual artists, and filmmakers from Haïti, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico.

We will focus on theories of afro-futurism and eco-criticism in three interconnected modules:

  • Novels based on zombies and other fantastic figures in Afro-Caribbean epistemologies and religion.
  • Caribbean ecology and plant lore as a source of making new social and environmental configurations possible.
  • Imagining history, or in Glissant's words, a "prophetic vision of the past." Texts will include: Rita Indiana's La mucama de Omiculé, Pedro Cabiya's Malas hierbas; Gisèle Pineau's La Dérive des esprits, Maryse Condé's Tituba; Nalo Hopkinson's Brown Girl in the Ring and Erna Brodber's Nothing's Mat. Because this is a comparative, multi-lingual, and interdisciplinary course, we will rely on the collective translation of texts, among other creative projects. In addition to novels and short fiction, this course includes speculative fictions in digital and multi-media formats. Class discussion is conducted in English; FRW6938 students will read all available texts in French and do all written coursework in French while SPW 6934 students will read all available texts in Spanish and do all written coursework in Spanish.

Spring 2020 Graduate Courses in French

FRW4761/5765: Penser le Maghreb: Mental Functions and Aesthetic Forms

Instructor: Dr. Michaela Hulstyn

While the relatively new field of cognitive literary studies has focused on modernist texts from the Western tradition, the interpretation of Francophone literature from North Africa has been dominated by anthropological and historical approaches. This interdisciplinary course brings together research in cognitive science and Francophone North African literature in order to examine the relationship between mental functions and aesthetic forms. How do cognitive approaches to memory, theory of mind, language, and metaphor allow us to engage twentieth-century texts in new theoretical ways? We will examine the ways in which attending to linguistic features (writing direction and time-space metaphors in bilingual texts), mental features (memory, theory of mind, empathy, emotion), and cultural features (e.g. language as a tool for integration, differentiation, assimilation, or resistance) help us think the Maghreb in new ways. Authors include Djebar, Khatibi, Fellous, Fanon, and Ben Jelloun. Theoretical readings include Zunshine, Damasio, Scarry, and Boroditsky. Discussion in French.


FRW4775/5770: Writing disaster: Literature, Film, Art, and the Haitian Earthquake of 2010

Instructor: Dr. Martin Munro

What are the effects of a catastrophic earthquake on a society, its culture and politics? Which of these effects are temporary, and which endure? Are the various effects immediately discernible, or do they manifest themselves over time? What is the relationship between natural disasters and social change? What roles do artists, and writers in particular have in witnessing, bearing testimony to, and gauging the effects of natural disasters? These are the fundamental questions addressed in this course, which takes the case of the Haitian earthquake of 12 January 2010, a uniquely destructive event in the recent history of cataclysmic disasters, in Haiti and the broader world. Studying chronicles, novels, poems, films, journalism and visual art works, we investigate the many diverse ways in which Haitian artists have reacted to the disaster.
The course coincides with the international conference held on the theme of disasters in Spring 2020 at the Winthrop-King Institute. Texts/films:
· Raoul Peck, Fatal Assistance
· Martin Munro (ed.), Haiti Rising (UWI/LUP)
· Dany Laferrière, Tout bouge autour de moi (Grasset) 9782253162032
· Edwidge Danticat, Create Dangerously
· Gary Victor, Collier de debris (Mémoire d’encrier) 978-2-89712-066-5
· Makenzy Orcel, Les Immortelles (Editions Zulma) 978-2-84304-588-2
· Kettly Mars, Aux frontières de la soif (Mercure de France) 9782715233652
· Lyonel Trouillot, La belle amour humaine (Actes Sud) 978-2-7427-9920-6
· Rodney Saint-Éloi, Récitatif au pays des ombres (Mémoire d’encrier) 978-2-923713-66-3

Fall 2019 Graduate Courses in French

FRW 5588: Material Objects and the Curious Life of Things in Eighteenth-Century France

Instructor: Dr. Mrinmoyee Bhattacharya

Thursdays 5:15-8:00pm

This graduate seminar will consider the literary, cultural, and political discourses on inanimate objects and their relation to philosophical ideals of sociability and aesthetics in eighteenth-century France. Object collections involving things collected from indigenous cultures will introduce students to material contexts of global commerce and discourses on property, whereas the revolutionary pamphlets will help to think through the idea of objects as both space and medium. We will explore Diderot's Salons and discuss decorative art, furniture, etc. before attending to the ways in which Encyclopedie represents collecting. The engraved plates, including of sea shells and other objects that attempt to copy natural objects in porcelain will offer a vivid portray of the interaction between different branches of knowledge. Textiles and texts will help to explore the silences and representations in both literary and material archival practices. Authors include Montesquieu, Crebillon fils, Françoise de Graffigny, Voltaire, among others. Works by Beverly Lemire, Daniela Bleichmar, Madeleine Dobie, Chaela Pastore, Donna Bohanan, Maxine Berg, and Mimi Hellman will introduce students to varieties of critical frameworks to study material things. Taught in French. 


FRW 4770 / FRW 5765 Education and Identity in Francophone Africa: Literature, Film, and Graphic Novels

Instructor: Dr. Michelle Bumatay

Tuesdays, 5:15-8:00 pm

This course examines the link between education in a broad sense and identity formation in sub-Saharan Africa over time and through various mediums including literature, films, and graphic novels. During the semester, the course will attempt to answer the following questions: What constitutes education? What kinds of education manifest in the texts? What effects does education have on the development of the protagonists, their communities, and the relationship between the two? What roles do religion, gender, and travel play? What are the social, political, and cultural effects of education? How do similar narrative tropes and conventions manifest in different mediums?


FRW 5595/ARH 5806 (Dis)Enchantment in Nineteenth-Century France: Interdisciplinary perspectives 

Instructors: Dr. Aimée Boutin in French Studies & Dr. Lauren Weingarden in Art History. 

Mondays 3:35-6:05pm 

This interdisciplinary team-taught graduate seminar will explore how nineteenth-century France was a time of confrontation between the age-old enchantment of faith, magic, and tradition, and the modern lure of rationalization, science, and innovation, leading to what Max Weber called the "disenchantment of the world." The nineteenth century is also a period of developing technologies and economies of popular entertainment, such as the circus and proto-cinematic shows. Along these lines, we will explore enchantment as a reward system that delights and inspires, or an enthrallment that constrains and inhibits. Enchantment can be a visceral experience of spectacle or one that plays with the simulacra of illusion. The seminar explores the theme of the 2019 Nineteenth-Century French Studies Annual Colloquium, Enchantment and Disenchantment, organized by the instructors, Drs Weingarden and Boutin, and scheduled October 31-November 2, 2019 in Sarasota. Offered in English. 

 
Previously Offered Courses

NOTE: Course number, Instructor, Description and any other information is subject to future change. These courses are only listed for informational purposes with regards to past versions of the courses offered!

Graduate

FRW 4433/FRW 5587 Studies in 17th-Century Literature: Le Grand Siècle

Instructor: Dr. Reinier Leushuis

Tuesday & Thursday 3:35-4:50 PM

In this course we will study the literature of seventeenth-century France (Le Grand Siècle) in its social-historical context. We will analyze significant examples of the major literary genres thriving in this time period (such as tragedy [Corneille, Racine], comedy [Molière], the early modern novel [Mme de La Fayette], and maxims [La Rochefoucauld]) and study how they both stage and question the social, political, and religious universes of their authors and readers (the court, the salon, etc.). In doing so, particular attention will be paid to the role of marriage and other models of affection between the sexes. In addition, students will familiarize themselves with many of the major components of seventeenth-century French culture and society, such as the notions of glory and the heroic, the valorization of the absolute monarchy, as well as French classicism’s exploration of the opposition between reality and play, and between truth and imagination. This class will be conducted in French and all course work will be in French. Undergraduates: FRW 3100 or FRW 3101 is prerequisite for this class. Graduates: this class will cover a majority of works on the MA reading list.


FRW 4770/ FRW 5775 Francophone Cultures: Citizenship, Difference, and Belonging: A transhistorical and transnational perspective

Instructor: Dr. Mrinmoyee Bhattacharya

Mondays and Wednesdays 3:35-4:50 PM

Who gets to be a citizen? How do bodily imaginings of the individual and the citizen change over time? How do nation-states, colonial authorities, and cultural productions conceptualize bodies? How do constructed political bodies structure our understanding of the universal and the particular? This course will look at literary representations and configurations of bodies in multiple registers and with different markers: as subjects, citizens, non-citizens, migrants, and religious and heretic bodies, among others. Probing relationship between individuals and authority, identity and state, we will discuss the ways in which bodies are surveyed, negotiated, and classified through lenses of gender, race, religion, and culture. Though most of our primary readings will be from the contemporary French and Francophone literary canon, we will often foray into texts from previous centuries which will illuminate our understanding of the present. Authors include Sami Tchak, Cheikh Hamidou Kane, Fatou Diome, Bessora, Scholastique Mukasonga, Alain Mabanckou , Azouz Begag, Marie Ndiaye, Léonora Milano, Achille Mbembe, Benetta Jules-Rosette, and Claire Duras among others. Themes included: Colonial Cultures, Exile, Memories, and Migrations in French and Francophone Literature.


FRW 6938 Vodou, Race and Revolution in Haiti, 1804-2004

Instructor: Dr Martin Munro

Tuesdays 5:15-8:15 PM

Haiti is one of the most fascinating countries in the Americas. There are two dominant conceptions of Haiti: that it is the first black republic in the New World and also the poorest country in the Western hemisphere. This course seeks to understand and go beyond these two clichéd ideas of Haiti, and consider some of the diverse ways it has been represented in film, poetry, fiction, ethnography, and historiography from the eighteenth century to the present. We will consider works by Haitians, but also representations of Haiti from the outside, by European and American travelers, ethnographers, and novelists. The aim will be to set up a dialogue between the various representations and to consider how they have contributed to our understanding of this most complex and intriguing American nation. Key themes will include: race, class, violence, politics, and religion. Taught in English; all works in English.


FRW 5595 Studies in 19th Century Literature and Cultures

Instructor: Dr. Aimée Boutin

Wednesday 5:15-8:00pm

Title: Listening to Nineteenth-Century France / À l’écoute du dix-neuvième siècle

This seminar examines representations of the voice, sound, and silence during the long nineteenth century. Themes will range from soundscapes, the grain of the singer’s voice, the voices of the dead, working-class voices, as well as orality in salons, in the press, and in fiction. What powers does the voice carry? How do writers capture the voice in the era before recording technology ? How does writing—first person narration or in the framedrécit—inscribe, efface, or affirm vocal traces? Readings include René by Chateaubriand, Sarrasine by Balzac, La Marquise by Sand, Domenica by Desbordes-Valmore, Carmen by Mérimée, Un Cœur simple by Flaubert,L’Assommoir by Zola, and Combray by Proust. In French.

Il s’agira dans ce séminaire d’explorer les représentations de la voix, du son et du silence au XIXe siècle. Nous aborderons une sélection de thèmes dont le paysage sonore ; le « grain » de la voix du chanteur/de la chanteuse ; la voix des morts ; les voix du peuple ; les pratiques de l’oralité dans les salons littéraires, dans la presse, dans le roman. Quels sont les pouvoirs de la parole ? Comment capter l’émission sonore avant l’invention de la reproduction des sons? Comment l’écrit—que ce soit la narration à la première personne ou dans le récit encadré—porte-t-il les traces de l’inscription, de l’effacement, ou de l’affirmation de la voix ? Nous examinerons ces questions dans les textes suivants : René de Chateaubriand, Sarrasine de Balzac, La Marquise par Sand,Domenica par Desbordes-Valmore, Carmen de Mérimée, Un Cœur simple par Flaubert, L’Assommoir par Zola, et Combray par Proust. En français.


FRW 4480/5765 Studies in Francophone Literatures and Cultures

Instructor: Dr. Jeannine Murray-Román

Thursday 3:35 PM - 4:50 PM

Title: Manifesting the Avant-Garde in 20th and 21st century French Art and Activism

Focused on the surrealist movement, mai 68, and the 2009 Guadeloupe general labor strike, this course explores how artists have led the way and thrown themselves in with the political movements of their moment. In each case, we will read one central manifesto alongside the experimental poetry, plays, and performance happenings that manifested the concepts and desires for a new world as articulated in the manifesto. We will set these readings in the context of the local networks of friendships and physical sites that sheltered their creativity as well as the international political and artistic movements that informed them. In French.


Graduate French Language (FRE)

FRE 5060/5069 Graduate Reading Knowledge, Class and Exam - Dr. Marie-France Prosper-Chartier

This course provides a systematic approach to, and strategies for, reading French scholarly texts and translating them into English. Basic vocabulary and grammatical structures are introduced, and students have the opportunity to practice reading comprehension and translating French texts into English throughout the semester. This course prepares students for the language requirement exam administered at the end of the semester.


Graduate French Literature (FRW)

FRW 5595 - Studies in 19th Century French Literature: Nineteenth-Century Paris, Capital of Modernity

Dr. A. Boutin

Paris is not merely the privileged decor of the 19th-century French novel. Paris, the city of Lights, is one of its most prominent and colorful protagonists. Whether contemplated, lived, dreamed, adored or despised, Paris attained mythical status in the nineteenth century. Writers attempted to read and decipher its intriguing cultural codes and languages and understand its changing dimensions as it grew into a modern metropolis at the center of the western world. This class will take students on a tour of Parisian neighborhoods and urban landmarks, old and new Paris, the criminal underworld and the artists’ Bohemia, working-class and suburban Paris through the writings of Balzac, Girardin, Hugo, Murger, Maupassant, Zola, and Colette. This interdisciplinary course will include discussions of novels, paintings, photographs, and opera. Taught in French.


FRW 6938 Graduate Seminar in French: Blues Writing: Jean-Claude Charles and Modern Caribbean Writing

Dr. Martin Munro

In French. Open exclusively to graduate students.

This course is based around the Winthrop-King spring 2018 event that brings together leading international authors, artists, and scholars in a celebration of the work of one of Haiti’s most talented and yet least read or understood writers. Through a combination of readings, workshops, and debates we will assess the legacies of this singular figure in Caribbean writing. Importantly, we will also read works by many of the invited speakers, as a way of preparing for the event. It is also intended that there will be a practical element to the course whereby students will be able to work on and acquire skills in conference organization. In French.


FRW 6938 - Graduate Seminar in French Literature: Comparative Approaches to the Caribbean: "The Practices of Decolonization in Theory, Poetry, and Theater"

Dr. J. Murray-Román

[Graduate course only, offered to students throughout the department]. This comparative course examines Anglophone, Francophone, and Hispanophone writing that aims to both a) decolonize Caribbean intellectual formations and b) generate decolonizing operations that can be exercised globally. Given the massive influence of thinkers from the Caribbean region in postcolonial thought, we will read the work of Caribbean thinkers and artists whose ideas have developed in contrapuntal response to the region's environments, geo-politics, and histories. Class discussion will be in English and texts in French and Spanish will be considered both in the original and in translation according to students' linguistic access. This course offers encounters, bookends, and repetitions with a difference. The questions that emerge from reading comparatively across geopolitical and historical differences that we will tackle include: reimagining the parameters of human relations in theory and theater (Glissant; Wynter); Rastafari philosophy on reparations and repatriation and their linguistic influence on Jamaican poetry (Bennett; Mutabaruka); the reclamation of the archives (Kanor; Philip); and the imagination of sovereignty in Puerto Rican poetry (Julia de Burgos; Raquel Salas-Rivera). Many of these writers are reading one another, but other poetic responses to the political legacies of colonialism emerge in spite of their absence of circulation. This course, therefore, deploys comparative methodologies to identify connections and resonances in Caribbean theories and poetics of decolonization.

Also listed as FOL 5934-01 Problems and Studies in Modern Languages and Literature. In English

Advanced

Advanced French Language (FRE)

Advanced Conversation (FRE4410) -- Dr. Marie-France Prosper-Chartier

This class develops French oral expression at an advanced level by focusing on speaking skills, listening comprehension skills, and vocabulary acquisition. Students have the opportunity to work on these competencies through tasks and activities that include reading assignments (press articles and other texts) for in-class discussion and debate on a variety of topics. These assignments and activities are supplemented with the screening of a film, viewing videos, listening to songs, and vocabulary building activities. This class satisfies the University Oral Competency requirement. Students develop their public speaking skills by learning the principles of effective speech, and applying what they have learned by delivering two different speeches (informative and special occasion), 3-5 minutes in length, and by participating in a debate.


FRE 5060/5069 Graduate Reading Knowledge, Class and Exam - Dr. Marie-France Prosper-Chartier

This course provides a systematic approach to, and strategies for, reading French scholarly texts and translating them into English. Basic vocabulary and grammatical structures are introduced, and students have the opportunity to practice reading comprehension and translating French texts into English throughout the semester. This course prepares students for the language requirement exam administered at the end of the semester.


Advanced French Literature (FRW)

FRW 4770/5775 Introduction to Francophone Caribbean Culture - Dr. Martin Munro

The Francophone Caribbean consists primarily of the French Départments d'outre mer (DOMs) of Martinique, Guadeloupe, and Guyane, and the Republic of Haiti, independent since 1804. While these territories share a common history involving colonialism and plantation slavery, they also have widely divergent experiences in terms of political status and economics. This course will introduce students to the history and culture of these fascinating places. The focus will primarily be on the period from the mid-twentieth century to the present. In the DOMs, this period begins with the Négritude movement, moves through Frantz Fanon's critique of Négritude, Edouard Glissant's Antillanité, and ends with the Créolité movement. In Haiti, the period covered begins with the Indigenist movement, and moves through the Duvalier era, reading and viewing works that challenge traditional, masculinist versions of Haitian history. Recurring themes will include: race and color; social class; language; exile; history; and memory. Works studied will include poems, novels, films and some recent visual art from Haiti. The course is taught in French.


FRW 4770/5775 Vodou, Race and Revolution in Haiti, 1804-2013 - Dr. Martin Munro

Haiti is one of the most fascinating countries in the Americas. There are two dominant conceptions of Haiti: that it is the first black republic in the New World and also the poorest country in the Western hemisphere. This course seeks to understand and go beyond these two clichéd ideas of Haiti, and consider some of the diverse ways it has been represented in film, poetry, fiction, ethnography, and historiography from the eighteenth century to the present. We will consider works by Haitians, but also representations of Haiti from the outside, by European and American travelers, ethnographers, and novelists. The aim will be to set up a dialogue between the various representations and to consider how they have contributed to our understanding of this most complex and intriguing American nation. Key themes will include: race, class, violence, politics, and religion.


FRW 4460/5595 Charles Baudelaire and Poetic Modernity/Charles Baudelaire et la modernité poétique - Dr. Aimée Boutin

Considered by many to be the father of modern poetry and an undisputed precursor of Modernism, Charles Baudelaire modernized the sonnet and the lyric, developed the prose poem and also wrote important essays (on his contemporaries, on intoxicants, on music), and art criticism. We examine Baudelaire's poetic works in their broader literary, historical, and critical context, relating the poems to his prose writings, comparing them to his contemporaries' works and situating them in relation to such figurative or critical concepts such as self and other, love and suffering, good and evil, memory and loss, time and space, spleen and ideal, flânerie and modernity. In the words of Claude Pichois, one of the foremost Baudelaire scholars: « L'oeuvre de Baudelaire n'est pas une oeuvre poétique parmi d'autres ; elle est une révolution, la plus importante de toutes celles qui ont marqué le siècle ; elle décide de ce qui désormais portera nos yeux les couleurs de la poésie ».


FRW 4460/5595 Paris, Capital of the 19th Century / Paris, Capitale du XIXe siècle - Dr. Aimée Boutin

Paris is not merely the privileged decor of the 19th-century French novel. Paris, the city of Lights, is one of its most prominent and colorful protagonists. Whether contemplated, lived, dreamed, adored or despised, Paris attained mythical status in the nineteenth-century. Writers attempted to read and decipher its intriguing cultural codes and languages, and understand its changing dimensions as it grew into a modern metropolis at the center of the Western world. This class will take students on a tour of aristocratic and popular neighborhoods, old and new Paris, the criminal underworld and the artists' Bohemia, working-class Paris and the universe of Parisian women, through the writings of Balzac, Sand, Baudelaire and Zola as well as Puccini's opera La Bohème based on Murger's Scènes de la vie de bohème and Eugène Sue's Les Mystères de Paris. This interdisciplinary course will include discussions of novels, poems, paintings, photographs and opera.


FRW 4420/5586 Gender and Genre in French Renaissance Literature - Dr. Reinier Leushuis

Departing from a socio-historical context, this course will examine how literary genre shapes representations of and attitudes toward gender in the French Renaissance. How do specific literary forms, such as love poetry, humanist and courtly dialogue, Renaissance novella, and Montaigne's essay depict, criticize, idealize, parody, glorify, vilify, etc., the masculine and feminine gender as well the interaction between the sexes as it is variously defined by courtly love, sexuality, friendship, marriage, and religious practices? In our readings, we will focus not only on how the various genres treat these issues, but also on whether and how authors tried to influence society, e.g. through exemplarity. The class will be conducted in French and all course work will be written in French. This class will cover a majority of works on the MA reading list (e.g. Marguerite de Navarre's Heptaméron, François Rabelais's Gargantua, the poetry of Clément Marot and the Pléiade, Louise Labé's Sonnets, and Montaigne's Essays) and thus forms an excellent preparation for your MA exams.


FRW 4420/5586 Montaigne, Pascal, Descartes: Self, Reason, and the Passions in French Culture and Literature of the Late Renaissance and Early Classicism - Dr. Reinier Leushuis

This course will be an in-depth exploration of the works of these three key humanist thinkers of the early modern and classical period. We will first focus on Montaigne's Essays, which we will utilize as a prism to understand both late French Renaissance culture and the major values of humanist literature, such as the emulation of ancient rhetorical forms and philosophical schools (e.g. Stoicism, Epicureanism, skepticism), the importance of education, the concern with the individual in its socio-political and religious surroundings, and the valorization of the self as a source of doubt, judgment, and knowledge. We will also address the literary form of the essay as a protean literary space that can absorb the poetics of a variety of other genres (poetry, dialogue, oratory, etc.). Montaigne's Essays will then form the springboard for our exploration into the thought of Descartes and Pascal. We will read their works not so much for the historical impact they had on theology and/or philosophy (which is amply addressed in courses on Western philosophy), but rather for a) the way in which they both continue and transform early modern humanist concerns of self, judgment, knowledge, truth, reason, and the emotions; and b) their formal, literary, and rhetorical staging of these concerns. For instance, we will assess to what extent the famous notions of Descartes's moi pensant ("thinking self") and Pascal's roseau pensant ("thinking reed") and "order of the heart" (l'ordre du coeur: "le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît pas" ["The heart has reasons that reason cannot know"]) can be understood as corollaries of Montaigne's "book of the self" (Regosin).


FRW 4420/5586 - ITW 5415/4400 Dialogues of the French and Italian Renaissance

Dr. Reinier Leushuis

Taught in English. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students

While Italy is traditionally considered the cradle of the Renaissance, European humanism is profoundly indebted to the rich interaction between Italy and France at this time. This course will explore the various ‘dialogues’ between Italian and French literature and culture during the Renaissance. We will read the texts of French travelers in Italy and Italian artists in France; we will compare the ways in which Italian and French Renaissance authors crafted and legitimized not only their societies and cultures but also their vernacular languages in light of the imitation of classical antiquity; we will study the influence of Italian poetry and prose in shaping the ideologies and experiences of love and desire; and we will compare the exemplary role of women authors and thinkers in both cultures. In addition to lyric poetry and prose (e.g. the novella) this course will pay particular attention to the dialogue, a literary text staging several interlocutors debating issues of the time. We will appreciate the new-found popularity of this form in both countries in the context of the humanist questioning of dogmatism, and the need to cover the complexities

of humankind in a variety of voices in debate. This course will be thematic in nature, so that in each session we will combine and discuss texts from both the Italian and French Renaissance around a certain theme. The course will be taught in English and all readings will be available in English translation. However, to the extent logistically possible, all texts will be made available in their original language and, depending on enrollment, break-out sessions will be organized where works will be discussed in the target language. All student work, such as midterm and final papers and weekly e-mailed reader responses, must be written in the student’s target language (French or Italian).


Undergraduate

Intermediate Foreign Languages, Comparative Literature (FOW)

FOW 3240 Literature and Sexuality

Dr. R. Leushuis

Summer B, 2017 - Tuesday & Thursday, 2:00-4:50 PM, DIF 129
This course covers issues of sexuality and gender in the modern novel and the ways in which modern (Western) fiction stages the relationship between sexuality and society. We will focus in particular on the notion of sexual identity as defined in varying degrees by biological sex and societal gender constructions, and on the way in which literary works stage sexual identities. This course will involve themes such as repression; the political implications of sexual identity; sexuality as exclusion and oppression; androgyny; sexuality and spirituality, etc. We will not analyze these thematics from a socio-historical point of view, but we will study the way in which the modern novel both stages and questions gender and sexuality. At the same time, we will explore a theoretical context of contemporary critical writings on these topics, most notably those of the French thinker Michel Foucault. Novels and works include Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice, Michel Foucault’s edition of the Memoirs of Herculine Barbin, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, Marguerite Duras’The Lover, Manuel Puig’s The Kiss of the Spider Woman, and selected short works of Georges Bataille.

Please note

This class is taught in English and all readings will be in English.
French Minors and Majors can earn credit by submitting written work in French
This course fulfills credit for the Liberal Studies Course Area: Humanities and Cultural Practice Designations: Diversity in Western Culture (Y), "W" (State-Mandated Writing).
This course fulfills credit for the Women Studies Program (http://ws.artsandsciences.fsu.edu)
Graduating seniors: a section of FRE 4930 Special Topics has been opened to accommodate a limited number of graduating majors who need a 4000-level course. It will involve extra work and requirements at the 4000-level.
Graduate students: a section of FOL 5934 has been opened to accommodate a limited number of graduate students wishing to take this course with supplementary work and requirements at the 5000-level (one extra novel, reading reactions, and a final course paper).
The course is listed under “French” on the Registrar’s page Course Lookup.


Intermediate French Language Courses (FRE)

FRE 3420 & FRE 3421 French Grammar and Composition I & II

An in-depth study of French grammar that helps students improve their writing style in French.


FRE 3244 Intermediate Conversation

This course is designed to help intermediate learners of French improve their oral communication skills. Based on the textbook Cinema for French conversation that integrates a wide variety of cultural issues, this course allows students to engage in vocabulary building and extensive practice of spoken French through class and small group discussions and debates, role-play, presentations, and interviews. Supplementary materials will include videos and movies.


FRE 3440 Commercial French - Dr. Marie-France Prosper-Chartier

This course prepares students for work in an international environment by helping them acquire the necessary communication skills and cultural knowledge. Students learn about key Francophone countries, in particular, France and Canada, their economies as well as their administrative and company structures. Students have the opportunity to develop the skills needed to prepare them for today's competitive job market by creating a personalized professional portfolio, which will include a personal profile, resume, cover letter and job interview. In addition to authentic and up-to-date texts, the course includes viewing activities that encourage cultural analysis, and improve students' listening comprehension and vocabulary acquisition. The course is conducted entirely in French.


FRE 3501 Contemporary France - Dr. Marie-France Prosper-Chartier

This course introduces contemporary France through the study of its socio-economic, political, technological, and cultural realities and issues (its languages, traditions, education, social life, and political system), and places France in an historical and international context. Students have the opportunity to express their ideas through activities that encourage critical thinking such as in-class discussions, debates and presentations, as well as writing assignments. Additional materials include presentations, articles, videos, and the viewing of two movies exemplifying and expanding on topics covered in class. The course is conducted entirely in French.


FRE 3780 French Phonetics - Dr. Marie-France Prosper-Chartier

This course is a systematic study of the sounds of French, how they are formed (articulatory features) and how they are linked together. Students also learn the symbols of the international phonetic alphabet allowing them to identify and transcribe the standardized pronunciation of French sounds and their corresponding spellings. A good number of classes are spent in the language lab where students have the opportunity to put what they have learned into practice, thereby significantly improving their pronunciation and intonation of standard French. The course is conducted entirely in French.


Intermediate French Literature and Cultures in Translation (FRT)

FRT 3520 Francophone Cinema - Dr. Martin Munro

This course focuses on the cinematic traditions of the non-metropolitan Francophone world, chiefly from sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. Students will learn of the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which filmmakers have produced their work. The emphasis will be on analysis and discussion of key themes and questions of style. The selection of a diverse range of films from different countries and different periods will encourage students to think comparatively, and to consider how divergent histories and cultures have created particular cinematic traditions in each country. Key themes will include: colonialism and its legacies; social class; color and race; the role of education; gender; childhood; exile, memory, and language.

FRT 3520 French Cinema - Dr. Reinier Leushuis

This course introduces students to the rich history and development of metropolitan French cinema, from the first films of the Lumière brothers in 1895 until the youngest generation of French filmmakers. Within a chronological and thematic framework, we will analyze films from the major directors and movements of French filmmaking. Students will learn of the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which filmmakers have produced their films. In doing so, students will also learn about underrepresented groups and issues of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, such as France's postcolonial and multicultural renegotiations of race and ethnicity, and the place and value of women and minority groups in French society. Moreover, this course analyzes to what extent French cinema can be called particularly 'French' by studying the influences of American filmmaking on French cinema. Finally, we will consider the contribution of French cinema to film as an art form. What was the unique creative vision of the director, screenwriter, producer, etc., and/or the 'school' to which they belonged? What were the esthetical and theoretical concerns of French cinema, how did these develop over time and how did the directors try to give shape to these concerns in the artistic elements of the movie?

FRT 3561 French Women Writers - Dr. Virginia Osborn

Students in this course will learn about, and review techniques and strategies for reading and interpreting complex literature. While we will cover a wide range of literary topics and cultural issues, students will acquire a special awareness of women writers' place in the institution of literature and will learn to identify recurrent plots, motifs and narrative techniques that women writers have adopted to express their difference.


Intermediate French Literature (FRW)

FRW 3100 Survey of French Literature: from its origins through the 17th Century - Dr. Aimée Boutin

This course is a survey of French literature from the Middle Ages through the seventeenth century. It introduces you to the major literary genres (poetry: epic and lyric poetry, the fable; theater: comedy and tragedy; prose: the romance, the essay, the aphorism, the fairy tale) and aesthetic movements of each period, while perfecting your command of written and spoken French. This course has an important cultural component: beginning with the history of the medieval manuscript, students are introduced to the historical context of each of the works we read. We will watch historical films on these periods, read a play together in class, and analyze a variety of other cultural materials relating to early-modern France (visual arts, architecture, music, etc.).


FRW 3101 Survey of French Literature: 18th Century through the Present - Dr. Aimée Boutin

This course will introduce you to a selection of well-known works of French Literature and their cultural contexts. The readings have been chosen to exemplify the most significant literary movements of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century, including le Siècle des Lumières, le romantisme, le réalisme, la modernité, le surréalisme, l'existentialisme, and la Francophonie. By reading, writing, and participating in French, you will increase your comprehension and oral proficiency in the language. Although there will be key lectures in class every week, a substantial amount of time is devoted to discussion in French.

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