Courses Spring 2020


GER 1120 – Elementary German I, multiple sections
For more information, contact:
Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed. May not be taken by native speakers. Students with more than two years of high school German or the equivalent should consult the department for placement. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GER 1120 – Elementary German II, multiple sections
For more information, contact:
Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Introduction to German. Oral comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing are stressed. Prerequisite: GER 1110 or 1120. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1111, 1121, or 2220. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GER 2220 – Intermediate German, multiple sections
For more information, contact:
Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu

Serves as final semester of the language requirement and as the transition to upper-level study. Contemporary reading matter, including films, slides, and recordings, serves as the basis for discussion. Prerequisite: GER 1121. May not be taken by native speakers. May not be taken concurrently with GER 1110, 1120, and/or 1121. Can be taken concurrently with GET 3130 and GET 3524.


GET 3130, Migration Literature in Germany
Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu
Classroom: DIF 0129
Course meetings: M W F 1:25PM - 2:15PM

This course will focus on the literature of migration exploring the sociology of migrant experience, challenging the concept of the ‘mother tongue’, looking at multilingual contexts (codes, registers, writing in the migrant literature as opposed to mother tongue), gender, and kinship. For this, we will read migration fiction in translation to explore the differences of migration across time. We will explore these questions in literature and adaptions.
This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites. Fulfills the Area IV Literature (W) and
Cultural Practice (Y) Liberal Studies requirements.


GER 3310, German Grammar
Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: Diffenbaugh 368
Email:  bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu
Classroom: DIF 234
Course meetings: M W 3:35 – 4:50 pm

This course focuses on the rules of German grammar and syntax and employing them correctly in speaking and writing at the Intermediate level. To increase their competence and proficiency in all aspects of German grammar, in this course, students will review the basic understanding of German Language they acquired in the language requirement and expand their language knowledge skills. In addition, the students will practice written and oral skills as needed in communicative activities through essays, letters, resumes, interviews, and presentations and through grammar exercises, reading, writing, listening and conversation.  
Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s consent. The course offers credit for the German major, minor, and elective.


GER 3500, German Studies
Instructor: Dr. Christian Weber
Office: DIF 316c
Email: cweber@fsu.edu
Classroom: BEL 0006
Course meetings: T Th 2:00 – 3:15 pm

This course, taught entirely in German, serves as an introduction to German studies. The course provides students with an understanding of major events in the modern history, culture, literature, and politics of German-speaking countries.
Emphasis is on increasing students’ German reading skills and their ability to discuss and write on literary and cultural topics. The course also introduces students to the basic skills and tools of literary analysis and interpretation.
Prerequisite: GER 2220 or placement test or instructor’s permission. The course is a requirement for German majors and offers credit for the German major, minor, and elective.


GER 4420, Advanced Composition
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Office: DIF 316
Email: aweber@fsu.edu
Classroom: DIF 129
Course meetings: T Th 12:30 – 1:45 pm

Good writing starts from information and inspiration yet also requires mastery of writing and grammar skills. In this course, students will become proficient writers for professional purposes by exploring writing genres such as the experiential report, the job letter, the commentary, the scholarly essay, and the debate). The course is taught in German and fulfils the Liberal Studies requirement for Upper Division Writing.
Prerequisite: two German courses at the 3000-level or higher (of which one may be GET 3130 or GET 3524); or Instructor permission. The course replaces GER 3400 as requirement for the German major for students who enter with advanced proficiency. It also offers credit for the German minor and elective.


GEW4591 (Studies in an Author or Theme)/GEW5595 (Studies in a Theme): German Humor
Instructor: Dr. Birgit Maier-Katkin
Office: DIF 368
Email:  bmaierkatkin@fsu.edu 
Classroom: DIF 234
Course meetings: M W 5:15 – 6:30 pm

Yes, Germans can be funny. This course explores various genres of humor. We will look at folk tales, comedy, satire, political humor, slapstick, jokes, Flüsterwitz, cartoons, and caricature. Our study of German humor covers a wide variety of German authors, artists, and philosophers who created and discussed humor. Among others, we will explore works by Kurt Tucholsky, Loriot, Gebrüder Grimm, Karl Valentin, Mark Twain, Erich Kästner, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Thaddäus Troll and consider how they construct and present humor. Immanuel Kant, Arthur Schopenhauer, and others will assist us in examining what processes are involved when one investigates the concept of humor. This course is taught in German and offers credit for the German major, minor, and elective.


GEW 4930 (Special Topics)/ GEW 5596 (Studies in an Author or Movement): Performances of Otherness
Instructor: Dr. A. Dana Weber
Office: DIF 316
Email: aweber@fsu.edu
Classroom: DIF 124
Course meetings: T Th 3:35 – 4:50 pm

German culture (especially acting theatre and opera) abound with characters of “strangers” and depictions of faraway fantastic lands. The course explores the German fascination with these alien and exotic figures and places. What has made them so attractive to German audiences throughout time? What do they tell us about the historical contexts in which they occur? Why does the fascination with the alien and exotic continue unbroken today, in our post-national, post-colonial, globalized era? How does performance thrive on hybridity and broadcast concepts of alterity and self-definition? 
This course is taught in English and open to all students. It offers credit for the German major, minor, and elective.


GER 5940 Teaching Practicum
Instructor: Dr. Tatjana Soldat-Jaffe
Office: DIF 362
Email: tsoldatjaffe@fsu.edu 
Classroom: DIF 216
Course meetings: F 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

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